Three posts about product development

Categories: product development lean agile lean value tree
I’m catching up on some reading at the moment. Trying to make headway on some other work while jet lagged is proving a challenge. Anyway, here are a couple of nice posts about product development that popped up in my feed (hat tip to Mind the Product Weekly Newsletter. ## What do people do in the spaces in between? When thinking about what people do with your product, also think about what they don’t do, and how to help them get to where they are going.

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PLOS are looking for a new CEO

Categories: plos publishing management leadership open-access
So I hear that PLOS are looking for a new CEO. They are making the process fairly open, so if you are interested you can read more here. I got to thinking about some of the challenges and opportunities facing PLOS over the weekend. Over the years I’ve gotten to know a lot of PLOS folk, and I think it’s an amazing organisation. It has proved the viability of open access, and their business model is being copied by a lot of other publishers.

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Reverse DOI lookups with Crossref

Categories: publishing citations doi programming crossref
Today I had a need to think about how to do a reverse lookup of a formatted citation to find a DOI. @CrossrefOrg helped out and pointed me to the reverse api endpoint. It workes like this: http://api.crossref.org/reverse Created a json payload file “citation.json” formatted as follows: [ " Curtis, J. R., Wenrich, M. D., Carline, J. D., Shannon, S. E., Ambrozy, D. M., & Ramsey, P. G. (2001). Understanding physicians’ skills at providing end-of-life care: Perspectives of patients, families, and health care workers.

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What we mean when we talk about preprints

Categories: preprints open-access publishing
Cameron Neylon, Damian Pattinson, Geoffrey Bilder, and Jennifer Lin have just posted a cracker of a preprint onto biorxiv. On the origin of nonequivalent states: how we can talk about preprints Increasingly, preprints are at the center of conversations across the research ecosystem. But disagreements remain about the role they play. Do they “count” for research assessment? Is it ok to post preprints in more than one place? In this paper, we argue that these discussions often conflate two separate issues, the history of the manuscript and the status granted it by different communities.

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SSRN and Elsevier

Categories: SSRN publishing Elsevier consolidation
So Elsevier has bought SSRN, a private company that fills a role for many academics that is an exemplar of the power and utility of a true commons for scholarship. There is much wringing of hands, gnashing of teeth, and the obligatory call for the community to pony up and create a true open piece of infrastructure. Well, it turns out building things is pretty hard, and building things that people will actually use is even harder.

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A(peeling) Peer Review, a proposal.

Categories: peer review open science transparency publishing
eLife’s peer review process is really good. One of the key attributes of this is that reviewers are not blind to one another, and they have to consult with one another. This largely removes the third reviewer problem. We also publish the decision letters and the author responses to the decision letter. Reviewers have the option of revealing themselves to authors. As with most review systms our reviewers know who the authors are.

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FuturePub Jan 2015 - Lens Next

Categories: lens elife lens publishing STM lens elife
On 2015-01-27 I gave one of the short talks at the FuturePub event. My slidedeck is here. I wanted to give a quick update on where the Lens viewer for research articles is heading. Lens is a great platform for experimentation, and we have been iterating on some ideas towards the end of 2014 that have now made it into the 2.0 release. The main update is that Lens can now be configured to accept information from a 3rd party source and display that information in the right hand resources pane.

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thoughts on the ERC data workshop

Categories: data open-access EU ERC data management publishing
On Thursday and Friday of last week I attended a European Research Council workshop on managing research data. It was well attended with about 130 participants brining views from across the academic disciplines. I’ve blogged my raw notes from day one and day two. In this post I reflect on the points I noticed that were raised over the two days. People have been talking about the increasing importance of research information for many years now, and a hope was raised in the opening comments that we might be able to provide solutions to the problems posed by the issues of research data, by the end of the workshop.

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ERC data management workshop, day 1

Categories: data open-access EU ERC data management publishing
initial thoughts about the workshop. Opening remarks. Setting the scene. Sabrina Leonelli - the epistemology of data-intesive science. Dr Hans Pfeiffenberger - Open Science – opportunities, challenges … @datasciencefeed. Bernd Pulverer - finding and accessing the data behind figures. Dr Roar Skålin - Norwegian researchers want to share, but are afraid of jeopardising their career. Summary of points from the scene setting. Afternoon breakout session - Life Sciences.

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ERC data management workshop, day 2

Categories: data open-access EU ERC data management publishing
Life sciences breakout - key points. Physical sciences breakout - key points. Humanities breakout - key points. Open discussion on morning presentations. Breakout session on incentives. Paul Ayris - Implementing the Future: the LERU roadmap for research data. Sünje Dallmeier‐Tiessen - Incentives for Open Science Attribution, Recognition, Collaboration. Veerle Van den Eynden and Libby Bishop - Incentives for sharing research data, evidence from an EU study. Open discussion after breakout session.

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