The state of retractions in the research literature.

Categories: peer-review retractions
The results below are oldish, but interesting around the rate of retractions in the scholarly literature, and there is currently a bit of a debate going on around retractions (e.g. What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’ | Science | AAAS Steen RG, Casadevall A, Fang FC (2013) Why Has the Number of Scientific Retractions Increased? PLoS ONE 8(7): e68397. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0068397 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0068397 https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/figure?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0068397.g001 The increase in retracted articles appears to reflect changes in the behaviour of both authors and institutions.

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RAVE publishing technology conference 2018

Categories: drafttoblog publishing rave technology innovations blockchain
I took some notes on some of the sessions at the conference yesterday. Dave Smith - object oriented publishing. Dave makes a good case here about how we should think about the future of scholarly publishing — in terms of objects that can be reformed based on the needs and competencies of the readers. He points out that while we do have in place good ontologies and domain models, our entire view of publishing and our publishing infrastructures, remain laggy and are a barrier to moving in this direction.

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Belmont Forum Round Table - data accessibility statements

Categories: data research funders belmont open-science
Yesterday I attended a round table discussion hosted by the Belmont Forum about the release of their position on data accessibility statements and digital objects management plans. (It’s a bit of a mouthful, but the reason is that they are aiming to be clear and comprehensive around what they are asking to make it easier for researchers, publishers and other stakeholders to get to compliance around this policy.) You can read their position paper — Draft DAS Statement and Policy for October 2018 Plenary - Google Docs.

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One Two Four All - a technique for getting insights from groups

Categories: product-development techniques groupwork
I’ve started working my way through The Surprising Power of Liberating Structures - a hand book of techniques for collaborative work. So far I’ve tried one technique from the book - one two four all. The idea is super simple and is an alternative to open brainstorming or post-it note sessions. Before describing the technique with a few comments, I’ll just point out one of the weaknesses of a group work activity like a retrospective.

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blockchain in STEM - part 3

Categories: blockchain hype-machine stem science publihsing
Over the last few weeks I’ve been writing up some thoughts on the uses of blockchain in STEM. The first post I gave a general overview of my understand of blockchain. In the second post I looked at potential use cases of blockchain in STEM, and came up somewhat short. That said, a lot, really, a lot of very smart people are talking about this, and doing things in this space, so in this post I wanted to look at a few of those efforts and see how their thinking lines up or diverges from mine.

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testing a new form of peer review - again

Categories: elife peer-review interesting scholarly-publishing
eLife is trying another experiment in peer review. When they launched back in 2012 they introduced a form of peer review known as consultative peer review. They are now looking at a new iteration on the peer review idea. Trials in how peer review is done are quite rare, so I think this is going to be interesting to keep track of. The new idea is that once an article has been accepted for full review by one of the editors, the journal is going to publish the article, along with all comments.

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notes on notes on “crossing the chasam”

Categories: product-development chasm
The following is not about scholarly communication, but is a post about one tool from the world of product development, how to think about marketing your product or service so that you can cross the chasm. Academic researchers are simultaneously the most innovative and conservative of users. There is so much pain in the process of academic research that there is a constant re-invention and invention of tools and proceeds, but at the same time there is also a huge time pressure, so for any new tool, technique or service to get wide spread traction is really hard in the academic market place.

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Distill is dedicated to making machine learning clear and dynamic

Categories: ai learning research future-of-publishing
Distill is an experiment in bringing interactive documents and scholarly documents together. I’m often asked what the future of publishing might look like, and were we to embrace what the web offers it might look like distill. Two things though, make it look like a nice product. Right now paper flow into this journal is very low, and secondly they have advertised a large prize to attract work in this format.

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Jobs to be Done A Case Study in the NHS | Digital transformation blog

Categories: design-thinking jobs-to-be-done NHS product-development
This is a great post on using the jobs to be done framework. There are two specific enhancements that are discussed - how to weight those jobs, and how to use granularity of the jobs to aid the design process (less granularity gives more freedom in the design phase). The authors wanted to use surveys to get a sense of importance of the under served needs, but in the end had to resort to a simple variant of card sorting.

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blockchain in STEM - part 2

Categories: blockchain stem publihsing hype-machine
In my last post I gave an overview of what blockchain is (while also confusing House of Pain and Cypress Hill. (These posts are probably best read whilst listening to either of those songs). In this post I’m going to look at potential use cases for blockchain in STEM and scholarly publishing. Scholarly communications use cases. When thinking about any use cases in STEM I think the questions we need to answer are:

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