RAVE publishing technology conference 2018

Categories: drafttoblog publishing rave technology innovations blockchain
I took some notes on some of the sessions at the conference yesterday. Dave Smith - object oriented publishing. Dave makes a good case here about how we should think about the future of scholarly publishing — in terms of objects that can be reformed based on the needs and competencies of the readers. He points out that while we do have in place good ontologies and domain models, our entire view of publishing and our publishing infrastructures, remain laggy and are a barrier to moving in this direction.

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OA negotiation manifesto from university of California.

Categories: STM business publishing library interesting
This is a really interesting initiative from the university of California. If the scholarly landscape looked like this then publishers would have to generate revenue entirely from services and derivative open products, rather than from content licensing. Most of the points is the manifesto are fairly unsurprising but two points stood out as interesting to me. Point 10 asks for all metadata to be made available including usage metadata. Are Counter reports sufficient for this, or is anything else needed?

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Preprints growth rate ten times higher than journal articles - Crossref

Categories: publishing preprints crossref
Great post looking into stats on preprints in crossref. Headline takeaways, preprint registration into crossref is 10x that of article growth, but it’s hard to read a lot into that as the absolute numbers are so different at the moment 2.4M per month (published articles) vs 10k per month (preprints). There is also some interesting data on preprint citations, preprint citations come in at best at a level of about 10% of the citations to the subsequently published article.

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scholarly comms product meetup - V2 - announcement

Categories: scholarly-comms product-development publishing meetup sage altmetrics
Back in November of last year we ran the first scholarly comms meetup with a focus on product management. There are lots of great meetups out there for people who work in scholarly comms, but we felt that there might be an unscratched need to have a meeting where the focus was not explicitly on community building, or on new technologies, or on public outreach, or on new trends and technologies, but solely on the product management work that is required to develop these kinds of tools.

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The robots are coming, the promise and perils of AI - questions

Categories: AI publishing libraries charleston dystopia machine learning future
I’m at the Charleston conference, my first time, and we had a panel discussion this morning talking about AI. On the panel were: Heather Staines Director of Partnerships, Hypothes.is Peter Brantley Director of Online Strategy, UC Davis Elizabeth Caley Chief of Staff, Meta, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Ruth Pickering Co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer, Yewno and myself. It was a pleasure to be on a panel with these amazing people.

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Futurepub10

Categories: futurepub futurepub10 publishing innovation networks music discovery yenow
This week I attended futurepub10, I love these events, I’ve been to a bunch, and the format of short talks, and lots of time to catchup with people is just great. # A new Cartography of Collaboration - Daniel Hook, CEO Digital Science (work with Ian Calvert). Digital science have produced a report on collaboration, and this talk was covering one of chapters from that. I was interested to see what the key takeaways are that you can describe in a five minute talk.

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PLOS are looking for a new CEO

Categories: plos publishing management leadership open-access
So I hear that PLOS are looking for a new CEO. They are making the process fairly open, so if you are interested you can read more here. I got to thinking about some of the challenges and opportunities facing PLOS over the weekend. Over the years I’ve gotten to know a lot of PLOS folk, and I think it’s an amazing organisation. It has proved the viability of open access, and their business model is being copied by a lot of other publishers.

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Reverse DOI lookups with Crossref

Categories: publishing citations doi programming crossref
Today I had a need to think about how to do a reverse lookup of a formatted citation to find a DOI. @CrossrefOrg helped out and pointed me to the reverse api endpoint. It workes like this: http://api.crossref.org/reverse Created a json payload file “citation.json” formatted as follows: [ " Curtis, J. R., Wenrich, M. D., Carline, J. D., Shannon, S. E., Ambrozy, D. M., & Ramsey, P. G. (2001). Understanding physicians’ skills at providing end-of-life care: Perspectives of patients, families, and health care workers.

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What we mean when we talk about preprints

Categories: preprints open-access publishing
Cameron Neylon, Damian Pattinson, Geoffrey Bilder, and Jennifer Lin have just posted a cracker of a preprint onto biorxiv. On the origin of nonequivalent states: how we can talk about preprints Increasingly, preprints are at the center of conversations across the research ecosystem. But disagreements remain about the role they play. Do they “count” for research assessment? Is it ok to post preprints in more than one place? In this paper, we argue that these discussions often conflate two separate issues, the history of the manuscript and the status granted it by different communities.

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SSRN and Elsevier

Categories: SSRN publishing Elsevier consolidation
So Elsevier has bought SSRN, a private company that fills a role for many academics that is an exemplar of the power and utility of a true commons for scholarship. There is much wringing of hands, gnashing of teeth, and the obligatory call for the community to pony up and create a true open piece of infrastructure. Well, it turns out building things is pretty hard, and building things that people will actually use is even harder.

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