thoughts on GetFTR

Categories: getftr wtfgetftwt access saml publishing libraries
what does it do? By using a single sign-on system (like SAML, or OAuth) a researcher can have their browser remember who they are. Today most access to subscription content is done via IP authentication. A university pays a publisher to access the content that the publisher hosts, and the university sends over a list of the IP ranges that cover the university buildings. Any researcher on campus just gets access.

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Rave tech conference 2019

Categories: rave publishing techmology
A few weeks ago I was at the aannual Rave publishing technology conference. It’s always an interesting event to attend. My main recollection from last year was the interest in blockchain. This year, as I reflect on how I feel about the meeting, I think I have two main things that have stayed with me. The first was the appeal from Tasha to ask us as a community and an industry to do more to think about removing barriers for early career researchers.

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key questions about AI in the publishing knowledge industry

Categories: publishing ai rules roi
At the moment one thing that is front and centre in my thinking about AI and machine learning in publishing and the scholarly ecosystem is how to make the case for ROI for investment in the technology, and more specifically investing in making data actionable. Overall I think there is great promise for challenges like knowledge discovery and machine generated hypotheses, but there is massive potential for these technologies to also just make the quality of our work better, and to increase the value of our work by reducing and removing toil in the workplace.

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RAVE publishing technology conference 2018

Categories: drafttoblog publishing rave technology innovations blockchain
I took some notes on some of the sessions at the conference yesterday. Dave Smith - object oriented publishing. Dave makes a good case here about how we should think about the future of scholarly publishing — in terms of objects that can be reformed based on the needs and competencies of the readers. He points out that while we do have in place good ontologies and domain models, our entire view of publishing and our publishing infrastructures, remain laggy and are a barrier to moving in this direction.

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OA negotiation manifesto from university of California.

Categories: STM business publishing library interesting
This is a really interesting initiative from the university of California. If the scholarly landscape looked like this then publishers would have to generate revenue entirely from services and derivative open products, rather than from content licensing. Most of the points is the manifesto are fairly unsurprising but two points stood out as interesting to me. Point 10 asks for all metadata to be made available including usage metadata. Are Counter reports sufficient for this, or is anything else needed?

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Preprints growth rate ten times higher than journal articles - Crossref

Categories: publishing preprints crossref
Great post looking into stats on preprints in crossref. Headline takeaways, preprint registration into crossref is 10x that of article growth, but it’s hard to read a lot into that as the absolute numbers are so different at the moment 2.4M per month (published articles) vs 10k per month (preprints). There is also some interesting data on preprint citations, preprint citations come in at best at a level of about 10% of the citations to the subsequently published article.

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scholarly comms product meetup - V2 - announcement

Categories: scholarly-comms product-development publishing meetup sage altmetrics
Back in November of last year we ran the first scholarly comms meetup with a focus on product management. There are lots of great meetups out there for people who work in scholarly comms, but we felt that there might be an unscratched need to have a meeting where the focus was not explicitly on community building, or on new technologies, or on public outreach, or on new trends and technologies, but solely on the product management work that is required to develop these kinds of tools.

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The robots are coming, the promise and perils of AI - questions

Categories: AI publishing libraries charleston dystopia machine learning future
I’m at the Charleston conference, my first time, and we had a panel discussion this morning talking about AI. On the panel were: Heather Staines Director of Partnerships, Hypothes.is Peter Brantley Director of Online Strategy, UC Davis Elizabeth Caley Chief of Staff, Meta, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Ruth Pickering Co-founder and Chief Strategy Officer, Yewno and myself. It was a pleasure to be on a panel with these amazing people.

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Futurepub10

Categories: futurepub futurepub10 publishing innovation networks music discovery yenow
This week I attended futurepub10, I love these events, I’ve been to a bunch, and the format of short talks, and lots of time to catchup with people is just great. # A new Cartography of Collaboration - Daniel Hook, CEO Digital Science (work with Ian Calvert). Digital science have produced a report on collaboration, and this talk was covering one of chapters from that. I was interested to see what the key takeaways are that you can describe in a five minute talk.

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PLOS are looking for a new CEO

Categories: plos publishing management leadership open-access
So I hear that PLOS are looking for a new CEO. They are making the process fairly open, so if you are interested you can read more here. I got to thinking about some of the challenges and opportunities facing PLOS over the weekend. Over the years I’ve gotten to know a lot of PLOS folk, and I think it’s an amazing organisation. It has proved the viability of open access, and their business model is being copied by a lot of other publishers.

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